Sunday, June 12, 2016

The stripygoose bird migration on Sunday Stamps

Today's Sunday Stamps is free choice.

I chose the stamp stripygoose used to send her Great Bird Migration of 365 postcards.



It is one I didn't even know existed, a no value indicator stamp (NVI) for worldwide postcards.








I believe they were first introduced in 2004, and discontinued in 2014 after a major revision in Royal Mail's international postage rate bands. More and more countries, and more and more rates are NVI ('forever' stamps in the US). This saves money for the post office, as they don't necessarily have to issue new stamps when rates change (and don't have to print, store, and ship low value make up stamps), and also gives convenience for the customer. Currently the US has domestic postcard, first class, first class 2 ounce, first class 3 ounce, additional ounce, non-machineable surcharge, and global NVI stamps.



You can see more about stripygoose's bird postcard migration here. If you received one from stripygoose and are a bit surprised, I may have had something to do with that.

Update: In answer to a thought below about the use of black on the postcard stamp, it may have been to differentiate from a Europe airmail NVI (blue), and a Worldwide airmail NVI (red). Others were issued too, 20g to europe in green, 20g worldwide in purple.


12 comments:

  1. Never knew that the Worldwide postcard stamp existed.

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    1. I was surprised that I didn't know about it, as I do get a few postcards from the UK most years.

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  2. A fine flock of birds. The postage weight bandings have reduced in number nowadays, good for tucking lots of things in an envelope.

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    1. I feel the same way here, since an international postcard costs the same as a 1 oz letter (about 23g), or 2 oz to Canada. Much more bang for your buck to send letters.

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  3. It's new to me, too. I like the airmail-envelope edge on the stamp (and of course I love StripyGoose's birds!)

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    1. Yes, the airmail edge is a neat way to let you know what the stamp is for. Funny how we are programmed to associate those red and blue stripes with airmail.

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  4. I had seen the stamp before, but it also attracted my attention, yes. We don't have different rates for postcards and letters any more.

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    1. I wish international postcards were cheaper!

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  5. There's a stamp I haven't seen before. You're right - those red and blue bands immediately call to mind 'airmail'!
    In this case, I think the stamp might look better if the words were also written in red &/or blue. Just my opinion.

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    1. I wonder if they chose black to match the color of the Queen's portrait?

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    2. I added links to the other airmail NVIs. This might clarify things a bit.

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